How the short story that inspired Arrival helps us interpret the film’s major twist – by Nick Statt – The Verge

“This post contains major plot spoilers about Arrival.

“In one of the final scenes of Arrival, the new first-contact science fiction film with a focus on linguistics, Dr. Louise Banks (Amy Adams) explains why she got divorced. “He said I made the wrong choice,” the linguist tells her daughter Hannah. It’s an easy line to overlook, especially as the gravity of the film’s second-half surprise sinks in. Throughout the film, Louise is experiencing not her memories of the past, but living out precognitive moments of her own future. She is experiencing time out of order, because her efforts to understand an alien language have irreversibly rewired her brain.

The credit for this narrative trick goes to author Ted Chiang, who plotted Arrival back in 2002 as a first-person short story called Story of Your Life. His work cleverly uses different tenses, mixing future, past, and present to weave the complex non-linear knot of Louise’s life in a way reminiscent of Billy Pilgrim from Kurt Vonnegut’s Slaughterhouse-Five.

Chiang’s hidden meanings, and the things that inevitably got lost in translating his words to the big screen, are pivotal to help viewers understand what Arrival is saying.”Reading Ted Chiang’s ‘Story of Your Life’ gives you a deeper understanding of the message of ‘Arrival’” ”

Source: How the short story that inspired Arrival helps us interpret the film’s major twist – The Verge

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About David Lindsay Jr

David Lindsay is the author of "The Tay Son Rebellion, Historical Fiction of Eighteenth- Century Vietnam," that covers a bloody civil war from 1770 to 1802. It was published by Footmad and Cherry Blossom Press on September 11, 2017. Find more about it at TheTaySonRebellion.com, also known as, DavidLindsayJr.com.
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One Response to How the short story that inspired Arrival helps us interpret the film’s major twist – by Nick Statt – The Verge

  1. I read up on Theverge.com, which has a category called: TL;DR
    WTFruitcake is that?
    Too long; didn’t read (abbreviated tl;dr and tldr;) is a shorthand notation added by an editor indicating a passage appeared to be too long to invest the time to digest. Long used on the Internet, it has birthed this wikilink WP:TL;DR to indicate a cited passage is being protested.
    Tl – Wikipedia
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Too_long;_didn't_read

    Like

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